June 30, 1949 Lois Shepard to in-laws

June 30, 1949

Dear Dick-

Bill is off again this morning for Vernom[?] Field. He’ll stay two weeks this time unless I call him home. I rather doubt it tho cause most everyone down here goes overdue. Just 4 wks to go so it isn’t too long. I’ve a few things to get yet & a couple more things to make.

Sue is still asleep & Kenny had dinner over at Eric’s & spent the nite. The new swimming pool is open now & it is really wonderful. Kenny has been every day & I took Sue Mon. & Tues. Mrs. Crocker (Kenny’s teacher) had a party for them all again

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yesterday at the Pool. It is really beautiful & the Club really will be nice when they finish. They are redecorating it entirely.

Dick-I’m enclosing $2 & want you to get me a few things & send me. I want 4-4 inch zippers in white for neck openings. Not like a dress placket. The kind that open at the top. And I want 5 nice glass buttons as big around as a penny. And a couple of cards of little white flat peach buttons for Susies dress. About this size [circle drawn on page]. A little bigger than shirt buttons also a couple of yards of white

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feather boning. If $2.00 isn’t enough let me know. I don’t get into Aqualilla now & they don’t have the buttons I want anyway I need the zippers for some shorts I’m going to make. They open down each side.

Went to O.B. yesterday* & I haven’t gained a lb. in 3 wks & only 2# the last two months so I guess I’m not doing too bad & I don’t stick to my diet religiously either. I’ve gained 15# altogether. I have to go to O.B. every week now.

Well thats about all for now.


*NOTE: Lois is pregnant with their third child.


Death by Railroad Car



Charles Brooks, a former resident of Cherry Valley, was killed by the cars at Hudson, Sunday [February 26th]. Particulars of his death have not been received. He was in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph company and was one of the most valued of its employees. Mr. Brooks was born in Cherry Valley about fifty years ago, and his boyhood and early manhood were passed there. He was a pleasant, companionable man and had many warm friends here, who will feel deep sorrow at his loss. He leaves a widow and one child, as well as one sister, Mrs. Samuel Millson [Eliza Jane or Jennie], of North Adams, Mass. and two brothers, Andrew of this village, and Benjamin of Hawthorne.1

Charles Brooks was the youngest known child of David Brooks (brother of my ggg-grandfather John Brooks). His sister Sarah, who married a Woodward, was actually still alive but not mentioned in the obituary. She was living in Rochester, New York with one of her daughters.

According to his wife’s obituary from 1953:

Her husband, who was an employee of the New York Central railroad, was killed in a rail accident on February 26, 1911. An only son of the couple met with accidental death while with the Armed Forces in [Delhamps, Mobile County] Alabama on January 5, 1917.2

Unfortunately, I have been unable to find out anymore on their only child’s death. I can only assume it was a military training accident. A sad end to this Brooks line.

1. The Otsego Farmer, Vol. XXV, No. 13, (Cooperstown, New York), March 3, 1911, page 1; http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html.

2. The Freeman’s Journal (Cooperstown, New York), January 14, 1953, page 6; http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html.

Source for image: https://ssl.bing.com/images/search?q=New+York+Central+Railroad&form=RESTAB&first=1&cw=2007&ch=1219

July 29, 1948 Lois Shepard to In-laws


July 29, 1948

Dear Dick & Dad –

I’m writing this with my new Parker “51” [awesome fountain pen!] desk pen Bill gave me for our 10th anniversary. He didn’t go to British Guiana after all so we took Lt. & Mrs. Hodkins to the Club for dinner. Flowers & candle light, Filet Mignon & Champagne. It was very nice, then we stayed & played Bingo [page2] ‘Course we didn’t win anyting and Bill won last week. Two silver Ronson table lighters.

I’ve really been working yesterday & today – cleaning closets etc. Things were getting in a mess – And there is no cooperation from the family. My suit-cases were covered with mil-dew & so I had to air everything.

We are to go to a dance & dinner tonite [page 3] for the squadron. Or at least put in our appearance. It’s an enlisted mens party. Then tomorrow nite is a costume dance at the Club. Always something to go to & not nearly enough to do it all.

Kenny & Sue are fine Kenny started another letter to you & I’ll have to get him to finish it this time. [page 4] While Mercedes does my lunch dishes I think I’ll take a nap – then I’ll have to bake something for dinner.



Charlotte Hatch Shaw 1888-1984

Charlotte Hatch is my great grandmother. I have vague recollections of meeting her in the early ’70s after we had moved back stateside from overseas. Mom, (as she was known by close family), along with a couple of other folks, probably including her daughter Evelyn, drove up from Ohio to visit at the time. Unfortunately I was too young for the visit to have made much of an impression, but hopefully by telling a bit of her story I can make up for that.

Charlotte was born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio on October 10, 1888. She was the daughter of Dillon Franklin Hatch and Almira Brooks and the youngest of their four children. But she only knew one sister and one brother growing up, the eldest son, Harry Douglas, had died at the age of 9 while the family was still living in Vermont.

Hatch children playing in the yard in Cleveland, Ohio.

Her father Dillon was the supervisor of a furniture factory which left the Hatch family comfortably well off. The couple used their good fortune to make sure their children received a well-rounded education, including music lessons. Charlotte learned to play the violin, and possibly the piano. She appeared in the local paper a multitude of times regarding some musical or singing performance, or sometimes simply as part of the local social gossip.

1906-05-13, Sunday, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), page 54 (GenealogyBank.com>newspaperarchives)
Social News of the Week
Miss Helen Roblee of 9812 Lamont Ave., N. E., entertained five of her friends at an apple blossom luncheon on Monday. The guests were the Misses Mary Fitzpatrick, Helen Whitslar, Charlotte Hatch, Nina Smith and Hazel Lane.

1908-04-14, Tuesday, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), page 7 (GenealogyBank>newspaperarchive):
In Society
Miss Belle C. Hart gave the second of her series of parlor recitals Saturday afternoon at 111424 Mayfield-rd., S. E. Those taking part were Lois Runge, Charlotte Hatch, Elliott Stearns, Harold Huhne, William Fristoe, Carl Patton and Numan Squire assisted by Miss Olive Harris, Miss Lilian Aokley and Miss Anita Runge, accompanists.

1908-12-27, Sunday, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), page 24 (GenealogyBank>newspaperarchive):
Music and Musicians
Music in the Y.W.C.A.
     The musical organizations of the Y.W.C.A. have been considered important enough to be given a department of their own, with a committee voted entirely to their interests.
The members of the music committee…are most enthusiastic, and want to do all in their power to see this new department become a center of helpfulness and joy and inspiration. Most excellent work was done last year in laying the foundation of these organizations, and they have already become indispensable. In the coming year they ought to grow rapidly in numbers and efficiency.
The orchestra is doing splendid work under the directions of Miss Belle C. Hart. On Monday evenings its twenty members meet for practice at the association building, where they have a most enjoyable time. The members are:
First violins…Miss Charlotte Hatch

Almira with her children in the Hatch family parlor, there appears to be much reading and piano practice going on. The eldest daughter Florence is on the piano, Charlotte is on the right reading in a chair, Almira and her son Herbert are on the left.

Charlotte attended East High School in Cleveland, and graduated in 1908.

Here is a page from the 1908 Cleveland Ohio East High School yearbook with Charlotte as a senior. She would have been 19 at time of graduation. Below is the school she attended. It looks like she received a classical education with German. Her senior tidbit read: “Gone but not forgotten.” Which means she must have left quite an impression on the school?


Less than a year after graduating from high school, Charlotte, at the age of 20, was married to a young man by the name of Montral Goble Shaw March 8, 1909.

newspaper_shawhatchmarriageOH1909 copy
Here is the newspaper announcement of the impending marriage.
Marriage registration.

While putting together timelines and mapping out Charlotte and Mont’s lives, something immediately stands out — Montral Shaw and his family were from Clermont County, Ohio which is clear down at the bottom of the state, as opposed to Charlotte’s stomping ground in Cuyohoga County, which is at the top. How on earth did these two people, from such distance challenged places, meet. Thankfully, because I do research on siblings and not just my direct lines, the answer to the question became clear. Charlotte’s brother Herbert attended Denison School, which is located in Licking County, as did Mont and even Mont’s sister Viola Shaw, all at about the same time (1900-1904ish).


Charlotte’s brother Herbert

So it is quite possible that Herb and Mont met at Denison and became friends. Maybe Mont came home with Herbert for a visit during a holiday or break, saw Charlotte, and ‘POW’ it was love at first sight! (Although they wouldn’t be married until a few years later.)

Here is Charlotte with her parents and husband Montral. In most of these earlier pictures of Charlotte she always look so sad/depressed/bored.

So now these two young newlyweds began to make a life together. And a year later, in May of 1910, Charlotte and her husband are found renting a farm in Jackson County, Ohio. Mont was supporting his wife as a fruit farm orchidist, while Charlotte was learning how to manage her new home. She was also preparing herself for the birth of their first child, Evelyn, who would be born in three months time. She must have been nervous, excited, and also anxious because her mother was very far away, and this would be a time that a daughter would want her mother around. Maybe her mother took a trip down to Lick Township, around the time Charlotte was due, to help her first grandchild come into the world.

This map shows all the places that Charlotte and Mont lived in Ohio. Their first home in Jackson County is all the way down near the bottom, where Evelyn was born. Their next move was to Geauga, back to the top of the state. They stayed here until the move to Texas in 1920.

3102584025_575b4bf29f_zCharlotte with her son John. Montral[?] is standing in the shed/barn. This picture was taken about 1913/1914.

After living in Jackson County for only a few years, they packed up their household goods and moved up north to Huntsburg Township in Geauga County where we find them by 1913, according to the birth of their second child John. Here they bought a farm which they owned until December of 1920 at which time they sold the farm and moved to Texas.

Above are the deeds for both when they bought 60 acres of property in Jackson County in 1915, and when they sold the same property in 1920 in preparation to moving to Texas.

When the railroad line was introduced in Cameron County, Texas a large land boom began taking place. (This is about as far south as you can get in Texas, without being in Mexico or the ocean). Agents from the area went out hawking all the great land deals to farmers in the midwest in order to bring new blood, and white people, into the area. There were even special trains being used to bring these new land owners to town. It sounds like Montral’s brother Norman heard about this great deal, proceeded to buy land, sight unseen, then convinced his brother and Charlotte to pack up their household belongings, and now five children, and come with him.

Here is the story as told by my grandmother Lois, who was only 9 months old when they made this trip:


It was December of 1920 – I was 9 months old, the farm had been sold and a new overland touring car purchased. It was loaded with the five children Evelyn 10, John 11, Margaret 6, Gertrude 4, and me 9 mo., Mom and Pop and the basic necessities of travel for a trip to the Rio Grand Valley in southern Texas.
Now in 1920, traveling more than 2000 miles over the highways of the day was not an adventure for the timid. My knowledge of the trip is strictly from the recounts in bits and pieces heard as I grew up. Pop loved to tell the tale with pleasure in the memories, while Mom sarcastically set him straight with the details of the discomfort and misadventures. She always hated Texas!
The reason for this safari was to farm a piece of land in the Rio Grand near Mercedes, Texas which Pop’s brother, Uncle Norman had bought sight unseen.
On the trip down I was awarded the top seat in the Overland a laundry basket made into a bassinet. I’m sure I was held on laps too, but I wonder if the trip created my fear in cars that lasted thru many years of travel all over as an air force wife. They called me a back seat driver when I was 4 & 5 years old. There were floods in Arkansas on the way down and Pop stripped the gears on the Overland and Mom and us children were put on a train for Little Rock, where Pop rejoined us after repairs were made.
Why Uncle Norman, an intelligent person I had always assumed, would buy land sight unseen and then let his younger brother make such a trip, I’ll never know.1
When the family arrived in Mercedes they found the land Uncle Norman had purchased had no water available – so they rented some land that did. It raised great truck crops but seems they couldn’t sell much as they couldn’t ship it north for some reason. The second year they were able with the other farms in the area to send a shipment of tomatoes north, 2000 bushels. A neighbor went with the shipment and evidently skipped with the money.”

texas shaws with auto
Looks windy, dusty and hot. La Feria Texas, January 1922.
mercedes texas 1918
Here is a postcard of downtown Mercedes from the 1920s.
Is this where the older Shaw kids went to school? [http://laferianews.net/?p=5468%5D

      Things did not work out as planned. Two years later they moved back to Ohio, leaving everything behind to be shipped. Pop sent money for shipping, but their things were never sent. Winter was coming on, and they had no winter clothes. John H and Evelyn [the two eldest children] lived with John and Sally Shaw in New Richmond for about two years (1922-1923) Pop and Mom moved to Westerville Jersey Farm in 1923 and the family was reunited.

Life in Texas was very unpleasant for Charlotte, especially when she developed malaria. So she would have been very relieved to be heading back to Ohio in 1922, where the weather was milder and the scorpions and malaria were non-existent.

By 1923 the family is back in Ohio, reunited, and living in Westerville, Delaware County (see Ohio map above), trying to get themselves back on their feet. Charlotte was also pregnant with their sixth child.

Nancy Jean was born 5 Feb 1924, but sadly she didn’t live long past her 1st birthday, as she died on the 21st of Mar in 1925. She was the only child of Charlotte’s who died young. They had one last child, Mary Ellen, who was born when Charlotte was 43 years old.

Charlotte was the practical one in their marriage. Like most domestic goddesses, she did the majority of the work: raising the children, taking care of their home, feeding everyone, doing all the laundry, managing, etc. Most of her life the cooking was done on a stove that was heated using wood and coal. Laundry was done in a tub with a washboard.

And while the life was hard and sometimes exhausting, Charlotte always let her children know that she actually enjoyed living on the farm much better than in a city.

Lois  —  “She liked to bake – always seemed to have cookies on hand – and made ice cream in refrigerator, which tasted like heaven to us kids. She passed on her mint-making skills to her granddaughter and namesake. Charlotte!”

Here is the family probably in the late 1930s to early 40s.

Lois remembering her parents:

    Pop seemed always the optimist, living from his dreams perhaps as much as his labors. A mischievous eye, finding joy in so much of life, loving to tell stories of people and events which we heard over and over but didn’t mind as he greatly enjoyed the telling. Mom, the realist, was more pesimistic she had to deal with the numerous tasks of each day, ending in weariness, I’m sure.

When we girls would be dressed up for some occasion he would say “you look very nice, but you will never be as pretty as your Mother”. This never hurt our feelings as by then Mom had gained quite a bit of weight and as we had little money she had no fancy clothes. I’m sure it boosted her ego a little. And she was very pretty before she became so tired and worn. Later when she could afford to go to the hair dresser she looked much prettier and had nicer clothes. She came from a city family and though not rich they had two “hired girls” in those days.

According to their daughter Lois, Charlotte and Mont made another move in 1947. The move kept them in the same county, but their address was now in Powell.

Early in 1947 they bought the farm at Powell, Ohio, in partnership with John and Bertha Shaw. There was a big apple orchard, and many a fall day was spent by the grandchildren in picking up apples for cider. Then the aunts, uncles and cousins would come to make applebutter. The children picked up apples, the women sat in the kitchen peeling, and the men “stirred” the applebutter, while drinking the cider (they had all the fun!)

Charlotte and Montral continued to live and work on their farm in Powell for many more years. Montral passed away in 1976 leaving everything including the farm to Charlotte. He was 90 when he died. Charlotte went on for another 8 years before she died in 1984 at the age of 95.


Her last letter to her daughter Lois was written August 14 of 1984 and talked about the mundane bits of everyday life, including the problems she was having with her current crochet project. Two weeks later she passed away. (I wonder if she was able to finish her afghan.)


Of Centerburg Charlotte H. Shaw
     Charlotte H. Shaw, 95, of Centerburg, died Aug. 31 at St. Ann’s Hospital.
She was a member of the Centerburg United Methodist Church.
Mrs. Shaw was preceded in death by her husband, Mont G. Shaw; two daughters, Evelyn Nevitt and Nancy Jean Shaw; a brother, Herbery Hatch; and a sister, Frances Herterprime.
She is survived by one son, John H. Shaw, Centerburg; four daughters, Mrs. Margaret Bevelhymer, and Mrs. Gertrude Van Tassell, Westerville; Mrs. Lois Shephard, West Bath, ME; and Mrs. Mary Ellen Adkins, Lucasville; 22 grandchildren, four step-grandchildren; 44 great grand-children; and seven great-great grandchildren.
The funeral service was Sept. 4 in Centerburg with Rev. Mac Kelly officiating. Burial was in Eastview Cemetery, Centerburg.


 (Uncle Norman [Ewing Shaw] served as Secretary of the State of Ohio for several years under both Democrats and Republicans, he was a Democrat, He was killed in an auto accident in 1930 at 54 years of age. Rockhouse State park in Hocking County Ohio is dedicated to him for his conservation policies. Editor of Ohio Farmer Magazine.)



May 29, 1948 Lois and Bill to Shepards


May 29, 1948

Dear Folks –

Guess I shouldn’t have sent that last letter to Canada. But I thot you’d still be there. So if the letter missed you all together – yes we got the package & thanks loads. Here’s $3 to cover cost of the items. If it isn’t enough let me know.

Just got the children to bed & not anything going on tonite so we’ll spend a quiet evening at home. Bill got back from Trinidad last nite. He’d been there since Wednesday.

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It so hard to find much to write about. We just do the same things over & over.

The kids will finish school next week & our trunks have finally arrived. Tho they haven’t been delivered yet. Hope to get them Tuesday. I’ve forgotten what I do have.

We are well into the rainy season now & it rains & rains – everyday. We do manage a few hours of sunshine but things in the house are getting musty. I’ll endeaver to get Bill to write a little in here.

Love Lois

[page 3]
Hello Dick & Dad:

Not much news as Lois had mentioned. Did she tell you that I took her up in an AT-6 last week? We were up about 1 1/2 hours and covered about half the island. Lois liked it very much and I think that she will make a junior birdman.

The kids have stayed in some lately. The rains have arrived. Ill try go get off a better letter next week.


December 30, 1947 William Shepard to everyone


Tuesday, Dec 30

Hello Everyone:

This is my last letter to Trenton Ill, barring any change in plans.

I just rec’d your letter  of the 25th telling about X-mas. It was just like having Christmas, hearing about it. Im so happy that the children had a good time.

Ill be going out to supper on New Years Eve. Capt Larsen is having a turkey! Reception at the club on New Years day for Col. Hanson. Aside from that Ill probably spend the rest of the vacation in our quarters. I have had a good rest, I really didn’t need one. Been reading and studying most the time. Go to the cinema every time it changes.

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I think that I have told you about everything that I can. Just as a check Ill go over a few things

  1. If you cant leave the car at the N.O. Port of Embark. make arrangements with a local garage to deliver it to the port upon our demand. Store it with them temporarily until invitational orders are forthcoming. We are jumping the gun a little, but down here they overlook it. Everyone comes down this way & they say its OK. All that is needed to ship the car is my personal transfer orders & you have them.
  2. If I cant meet you at San Jan check with the information office of Pan American at the air terminal in San Juan for a message. If no message come on up to Borinquen via taxi. Our quarters in 169B on Circle F. Drive.

That should take care of it. Ill try very hard to meet you in San Juan.

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but I may not be able to.

You wont need a passport as this is a US possession . In Trinidad, you would have needed one.

By the way our residence phone if 6278 my office phone is 5103 or 2162. In front of our house it says. Lt. Palmer, they haven’t changed the sign yet.

Tomorrow I must get paid! Thats first. Then get a commissary card., order another table, desk and a few more chairs from the Q.M. for our quarters. Thank goodness we dont have to pay for them.

The refrigerator shelves are being re-finished and the[n] electrician is going to go over the stove tomorrow.

Ill start stocking up on groceries this week end and perhaps by the time you

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arrive the larder will be well filled. Ill try to find a nice set of dishes. I hate to buy cheap Ill try to find some in San Juan.

When you arrive we can live with things as they are for a week or so, until you get organized. The place is a little bare without drapes (you know me) but it has enough furniture and it is clean.

Take your time and enjoy the trip as much as you can. If we don’t enjoy traveling we had better quit now, so see if you cant make the trip and have a good time! Ill be waiting for you.


P.S. Dont loose your sense of humor!

December 28, 1947 Bill Shepard to parents

This is a set of two letters. One written to each of his parents on the same day. Very poor spelling of places, and a just a little bit of that condescending white attitude toward the Puerto Ricans.


December 28, 1947

Dear Dick:

I am happy to hear that you will be with Lois & the kids until they leave. I know that it will help so much.

I hope that all of you had a fine Christmas. We were unorganized by the moving around but I think you will all understand. The main thing I guess is how you feel anyhow, and I want to tell you that I think the world and all, of my family.

I received your & dads package in time for Xmas and I want

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to thank you for the presents.

I am living in our quarters now. I am trying to fix them up a bit. The goverment furnishes stove, refrigerator, table & chairs for kitchen. For bedrooms they furnish beds  chests of drawers. In the living room-dining room they furnish a large table (seats 12) chairs, desk, and a type of bed that makes into a sofa. (We have 2 of them). So with a bit of arranging and some sewing of slip covers, we will make out O.K.

I hope you enjoy the trip. Be sure to see New Orleans if you go there. Take good care of yourself.


December 28, 1947

Dear Dad.

Everything is settled down now. Lois will soon be here, with the children. I am sure happy that Dick is going with them to New Orleans. It is a big help to Lois.

I have quarters here, and they are very fine. Although we have only 2 bedrooms the place is large. The goverment furnishes adequate furniture including 2 beds that make into sofas in the living room.

The climate here is ideal, 75° to 80° all the time. Palm trees & jungle. I guess that we will be here

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until about June 1950, unless something unforseen occurs.

Right now I want to go on record as inviting you down in 1948. I think that the trip and the sights here about would be interesting. It is a very quick trip by air, and if you want to come by boat, it takes only two or three days. Perhaps we can all be together next Christmas?

Dad, I want you to take my gun to the gunsmith and have him put a poly-choke on it, then ship it to me. We have skeet club here, and I could use it, if It wouldnt be too much bother for you to have it fixed & shipped.

[ page 3]
The houses here are built for the climate. They are low-bungalows, built of steel reinforced concrete with tile floors. The windows have slot type shutters, like a venetian blind, only they are very heavy. All windows are screened with no glass in them. We have a utility room in the rear, with a 66 gal. hot water heater (electric) and double wash tubs. In front we have a large screened in porch.

They just finished repainting all the woodwork before I moved in, I have built 4 lawn chairs and now Im banging together some bookshelves and a few other odds

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and ends.

The school-house is a large one and is 1/2 block away, as is the shopping district. There is a shoe repair, barber shop, restaurant, post exchange, theatre and even an ice-cream factory less than a block away.

The children have a playground — almost in the back yard, and everyone here has children.

I am working as the telephone construction & maintenance officer for the Caribbean area. It is work I know, so I enjoy it. I have several line gangs and cable splicing crews working and I get to travel quite a bit, keeping them going.

[page 5]
I have been in Jamica and Trinidad already, and I will be off to Antiqua and British Guina soon for a few days.

You know we got all these bases for 99 years from the British in exchange for those 50 old destroyers during the beginning of the war.

We have telephone systems on all of them and my crews maintain them from this headquarters. Bounquin field is the headquarters for the Antilles Dept.

The hardest thing I have to deal with is the Spanish language. I hope to pick it up in a few months. I can make myself understood only with a lot of hand motions.

[page 6]
These natives are exasparating. You explain what you want done to them, assuming they know some english They dont want to let you know how little they understand so they say “Si Si!” which means yes. So when you get back the work is done wrong and they are standing there grinning like chesecats* thinking they have it right.

Well. It will all work out OK. They have been getting along OK before I arrived so they will do OK when I leave.

I think that we will enjoy it here. I’ll write again later

Take good care of yourself

Your son

*maybe he meant Cheshire cats

December 20, 1947 Lois Shepard to mother-in-law

Dec. 20 —

Dear Dick-

I’m not leaving for New Orleans till the 3rd. of January. If I can make my plane reservations for Jan. 5th that is.

I’m really selling the furniture at a sacrifice. Wrong time of year I guess. But I have to get rid of it. I’ll never buy any more furniture as long as we are in the Army.

Bill has our quarters & is living in them I guess 5rms all tile floors. It sounds wonderful & I’m so anxious to get down there. I’ve a million & one things to get done between now & Jan. 3.

When will you come out and I don’t suppose you can go to N. O.

since I’m not leaving till the 3rd. However if you can it will be O.K. Hope to see you soon.


When did Theodosia die?

Theodosia (aka Theodocia) is believed to be the name of Clayton Webb’s mother. Her being named as one of the administrators of John Webb’s estate seems to give credence to this theory.

At a special court of the Common Pleas, June 8, 1805 —  John WEBB deceased. Administrators Theodosia WEBB & William WELLS.

Theodosia and John Webb are believed to be the parents of Clayton, John, jr., and William Webb, and possibly others. (Her last name is given as Clevenger, because it is said to be Clayton’s middle name, I have no evidence of any such thing; doesn’t mean it isn’t true, I just have no evidence of it.)

Using the ages of their children, we can assume they were born in about the mid-1700s. We know when John, sr. died because of his probate record from 1805. The only death date I could ever find for Theodosia was after 1811, because in a will for their son William, who died in 1811, Theodosia was again named an administrator.

So, over all the years that people have been researching the Webb family, the only death date they could come up with for Theodosia was ‘after Oct something 1811.’

While I was researching Clayton Webb’s land records in Hamilton County, Ohio something in one of the documents caught my eye.

deed_webbclay_vW1p294OH copy
Clayton Webb land deed, vW1p294, Hamilton County, Ohio. FHL Digital Film #8142621 online digital image 165 of 705.

The above deed was dated 1821, and it clearly shows ‘Theodocia Webb‘ as one of the witnesses to this deed. In fact I saw her signature as a witness on three of Clayton’s deeds in this time period.

The main take-away from this document is that, obviously, Theodosia Webb was alive in 1821 when she witnessed these documents. Which means she died 1821 or later. Once again land records show their worth.

So my question is how come no one else has seen this? Why am I the first to make note of it, in all the years folks have been researching the Webb family? Because if they have, I have seen no evidence of it in online family trees.

I have always wondered to myself if I was wasting my time when I would research what appeared to be already thoroughly researched surnames. But this just proves to me that even though others have researched, and even written books about certain surnames, they haven’t necessarily done their due diligence. There is always something new to learn.


December 13, 1947 William Shepard to parents

24th Composite Wing Hq.
APO #845 c/o Postmaster
Miami, Florida

Hello Dick & Dad:

Perhaps I can write a letter now that things have settled down a little.

I was sure suprised to be assigned to Borinquen Field, especially after being told that I would go to Trinidad. It is a beautiful base with the best climate of any US base.

There is a large school here just a hop from our house. It is much near[?] than Hilliards Schools.

Our house is a 2 bedroom one with a large living room & modern kichen. Electric range

[page 2]
and refrigerator. All time floors and plenty of closets. It is a beautiful place to live. Coconut trees all around. We will send pictures of the place as soon as Lois comes down w/the camera.

The grocery, barber shop, shoe repair, PX, beauty parlor, officers club and beach are about two blocks away. Everything is handy.

The quarters have the stove refrigerator, kitchen table & chairs furnished in the kitchen. The beds, sheets pillows & blankets and dressers are furnished in the bedrooms & in the living

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room a table & chairs and desk are funished. All we have to do is furnish linens, silver cooking utensils & curtains & drapes. Of course we will want to get a few chairs and some small things but we wont have to ship furniture down. Veneer comes apart here upholstered furniture moulds so I decided that Lois shouldnt bring ours. Rather than have it broken up or deteriorate I would rather sell it.

I have a good job here. I am directing the telephone system in the Island. Trinidad, Puerto Rico & the other

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Islands. Just what I have always done with the Bell company.

Dont have much flying to do here. Everyone takes it easy.

Ill write another letter in a few days. By the way my Xmas presents to the family will be a little late this year. I got here to late to get them off in time for Xmas so just hold on & celebrate about January 25th or so.

Write me the news.

Your son

P.S. Excuse the last letter, I was in a hurry to mail it!