August 15, 1945 William Shepard to parents…

August 15, 1945

Dear Mother & Dad & KW:

What do you think of the good news? You dont need to worry any more. Ill be out of the army & home in a few months.

For the present Louis will be here until Sept 1 and then she will probably come home Ill sell the car here, as I can get about $900 fo it.

I may stay in for 6 months or so, doing transport flying, I dont know yet but I

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will in a few weeks Ill let you know as soon as I know. If I get out in time I want to go deer hunting this fall & perhaps some moose.

Ill bet you are having a wonderful time. How is the fishing? Give Mr & Mrs Forder my regards & best wishes. Tell them Ill see them soon.

Take care of yourselves

Your Son
Bill

PS Susie says to tell KW she loves him

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Cain Tavern fire update…

I found another article regarding the fire that burned down Bert and Flo Cain’s tavern, it has a few more details and does confirm that the young lady living with them was Flo’s daughter from a previous relationship.

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“Wind Causes Heavy Losses Through Fire,” page 1 & 5; Oconto County Reporter, Oconto, Wisconsin, March 16, 1933, no. 24.

A case of slander…

3274299875_615a879761_oThe following newspaper clippings tell me the story of a court case that never really came to be. And, if it wasn’t for the local reporting on the matter, I never would have known about it at all. (From what I have seen it appears that Joseph Pinkerton might have been the go-to carpenter in Gillett.)

1878-1-26, Saturday, Oconto County Reporter vol. 7, issue 13, page 3, col. 2:
It is reported that Jos. Pinkerton has instituted proceedings against Wm. Johns of Gillett for slander, laying his damages at $8,000.

1878-11-02 Saturday, Oconto County Reporter vol. 8, issue 1, page 3, col. 2:
The slander libel suit pending between Joseph Pinkerton and F. W. Johns has been amicably settled, and dropped from the court calendar. It would be better if more law suits could be disposed of in the same way.

1878-11-16, Saturday, Oconto County Reporter vol. 8, issue 3; page ? col 2:
Court Proceedings.
The following is a summary of the court business disposed of since our last report:
J. Pinkerton vs F. W. John, Settled

So it appears that hot tempers cooled and better natures prevailed. Good thing for William, otherwise that would have been an expensive bit of slander if he had lost the case.

 

July 29, 1945 William Shepard to parents…

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July 29, 1945

Dear Mother & Dad:

It has been a week or so but forgive me for not writing Well it has been 7 years since Louie & I was married. I guess she has had a rather rough time of it. I have never been able to give her a home. Dont mis understand me. You & Dad have been wonderful about having us. Ill never forget.

I do want you and Dad to come out to Arizona. I like it here

letter_shepardw_to_shepardwr_1945_07_29_p02immensely.

I am flying about two or three days a week now. This country is beautiful from the air.

Our address after August 1st will be Route 2, Box 479 c/o Evans Guest Ranch, Tuscon, Arizona.

We are sharing a 6 room ranch house with another Lt. & his wife and 2 girls.

I really dont have any news so Ill close, wishing you a happy time in Canada.

Love,
Bill

 

Bastardy…

I swear I don’t go looking for this stuff.

I just wanted to know if the Isserstedt’s had a court case in Sheboygan County, because I remember a letter from George Hamm to his in-laws where he had asked if there was anything he could do regarding somesuch, and his father-in-law, Friederich, said to paraphrase ‘No. It’s all cool. They had everything in hand’.

Thankfully, Sheboygan County recently gave the Wisconsin Historical Society their court case microfilms. Yay! (Otherwise I would have to travel to Sheboygan to do research, and I didn’t wanna.) With a little digging, I was able to find that there was indeed a court case with Fred Isserstedt and, bonus, there was also a case that sort of mentions a George Hamm/en.

So, in a nutshell, it appears that both George Hamm and his brother-in-law Friederick Isserstedt, jr., (aka Fritz), were in court for bastardy. Meaning both men were accused of being the father of a young woman’s child. To be clear though, these are two different women and two different cases.

The case against George was in November and December of 1874. A woman by the name of Auguste Harp accused George of being the father of her child, which she had conceived in June of that year. The case against Fritz was in 1881, and appears to have continued to 1883. The accuser in Fritz’s case was Amelia Hecker.

About the time that George’s case was going on he was preparing to get married my great great grandmother Amelia Isserstedt, (which they did on 22 December 1874). Fritz had just married Phoebe Coon when his case was brought to court, (22 May 1881).

I can only imagine the stress and confusion of my great great Grandmother, and her sister-in-law at the time these cases came to court. Fritz Issersted in the pic below:

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Harp Family Picture copyhamm_george

The above two pictures are George Hamm and Auguste Harp (I found her picture on an Ancestry.com family tree site. )

The Harps moved to Iowa shortly after the case was brought to trial and concluded. And it is there that Auguste probably had her child. It is possible that Frederika Wilhelmine Harp Ludloff raised her for a short time, after which she was raised by Auguste’s parents, as a Minnie Ludloff is listed as a ward of the family, age 5, in the 1880 Iowa census, the age Auguste’s child would be in this census.

It is unclear in the case file if George was determined to be the father. Of course only DNA could prove it one way or another now. It is quite possible, and wouldn’t be at all surprising if George was. Although it would make for a refreshing change in the Hamm family sagas to know that he wasn’t, and couldn’t possibly be the father because a Hamm would never…nah.

In Fritz’s case we know the child was born 19 May 1881, but I have been unable to find anything more, not even if it survived. Amelia Hecker married Henry Sampse in 1883. And, again, we do not know if indeed Fritz was believed to be the father. It appears that the final conclusion of the jury was ‘Not Guilty’.