Be fruitful and multiply?

It looks like this particular Connelly Catholic couple took their biblical mandate quite seriously.

Unfortunately for everyone modern science was not up to helping these children survive after birth. Chilton Times, Jan 1861.
First 4 then 2. Crazy! Chilton Times, 18 Jan 1862.

Here is a list of all the children of Patrick and Elizabeth:
Francis Connelly b.1850 Rhode Island
Mary Connelly b.1852 Rhode Island
Thomas Connelly b.1855 Rhode Island
Caroline Connelly b.1857 Wisconsin
Dennis Connelly (Quad) b.&d.22 Dec 1860 Chilton, Calumet Co, WI
Theresa Connelly (Quad) b.&d.22 Dec 1860 Chilton, Calumet Co, WI
Catherine Connelly (Quad) b.&d.22 Dec 1860 Chilton, Calumet Co, WI
Winifred Connelly (Quad) b.&d.22 Dec 1860 Chilton, Calumet Co, WI
Elizabeth Johanna Connelly b.17 Jan 1862 Chilton ,Calumet Co,WI
Catherine Connelly b.07 Mar 1865 Chilton ,Calumet Co, WI

Last I heard from other Connelly researchers, it was not known for sure if Patrick was a son of Dennis and Winifred Connelly, but that might have changed. So it is likely that Patrick is an elder brother of my ancestress Winnifred Connelly Cain.

Patrick and his wife Elizabeth Connelly lived in Chilton, Wisconsin after emigrating from Ireland in the late 1840s. Well, Patrick most likely did, I don’t know anything about Elizabeth, (although I think I read somewhere that they married before emigrating, don’t quote me on that, and it is not really relevant to the story).

Here is another piece that come out in the Madison paper a few years later. Looks like there was a competition going on in the state.

Nine years later (1869) this article appeared in the Madison paper.

The only Patrick that comes close to Connelly in the Wisconsin 14th Infantry regiment is this one:

Carny, PatrickG02/05/62Enlisted10/03/62Killed

But I don’t think he is the same man, or they have several errors in the records regarding him. A cursory search at Ancestry.com databases make me think that after the war Patrick and Elizabeth headed back to Rhode Island to work in the mills. Maybe farming wasn’t for him.

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