September 30, 1960 Letter Herman To His Parents

Worthington Ohio
September 30, 1960

Dear Dick and Dad:

How is everything at Safety Harbor? All right I hope. You’ve been home long enough that you should know all the news, good, bad and indifferent. So we’re looking for a nice long letter to bring us up to date.

I suppose you’re wondering how I got along with my first meeting. Well I got along O.K. and we had six candidates to start their degree work. There were a couple of items of business that came up during the business part of the meeting that I didn’t foresee, nevertheless I got along all right. Maybe I’ll be lucky for the whole year.

We had our first frost last night and it was a dandy. I suppose that will be the end of the sweet corn and good homegrown tomatoes. We had a mess of sweetcorn last Saturday night and thought about you while we were eating it.

We had two “stinking” weekends at the lake. Week ago last Sunday we didn’t get out on the lake until 2 PM due to high winds and rough water, but manage to catch 40 nice jumbo perch, and yesterday we didn’t get out period.  The wind was blowing out of the north like a Gail and it rained off and on all day. I hope we get a couple more days as time is getting short. Will probably be pulling the boat

In another couple of weeks.

The grand chapter R.E.M. meetings are being held this week in Columbus, Wednesday and Thursday to be exact. The ladies are being entertain at a brunch Wednesday morning and some other activities are planned for the afternoon then will join for a banquet in the evening. I say that’s ‘rolling out the red carpet’ for the gals. I always enjoy the grand chapter meeting so I hope this will be a good one. Tell dad I’ll see Harry Sark there and will ask him about the Postal Service.

Believe it or not I think Charlie and June are going down to Saint Petersburg for their vacation and will probably arrive there next Monday. Charlie says they are going to look you up. But don’t hold your breath

Ruth took your watch down to Rogers jewelers last week and the repair man told her the main spring was OK and that it had been full of water etc. so she is taking it to Jack Dennick here in Worthington for his examination and will report to you later. Ruth thought the man at Rogers was “full of you know what”.

Ruth hasn’t been downtown since you left and hasn’t got 10 your birthday gift. So we’re enclosing a check and you can apply it to whatever you like, such as a fifth, Maidenform bra, new car, dress, or the grocery bill. Well I’m bout shot my wad so will close for now.

Love H.O. and Ruth

Germans everywhere…

Alexander and Margaret (Minor) Lantz headstones in Jacksonburg, West Virginia cemetery.

I bet you thought all our German ancestry came from our John side of the family. Well, surprise, you would be wrong.

Susanna Lantz was born on the 18th of April 1820 in Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Alexander Lantz and Margaret Minor. At the tender age of 16 she married Edmund Hays in Virginia.

Susanna’s father’s family was all German. Her maternal great-grandparents came to America about 1748 and her paternal great-grandparents arrived about 1747.

Susanna Lantz’s family tree, showing her father’s German heritage.

The Lantz surname is found quite a bit among the Amish in Pennsylvania, I do not know if our Lantz’s were Amish, but if they were, they didn’t stay that way, as later generations didn’t appear to be so inclined.
Alexander’s parents were Johannes(John) Lantz and Barbara Waggoner, which was Wagner in Germany. John served in the revolutionary war, in Capt. Henry Rush’s company of the Bedford County Militia. His name appears as John Lance in the official records.
Alexander’s mother, Barbara, lost her father when she was 7, to what was believed to be a Delaware/Lenai Lenape raiding party. Her father Wilhelm Waggoner, was out in the field when he was caught and scalped. Barbara’s sister Mary, was kidnapped along with her brother Peter. However, Mary was killed by her fiancé during a very inept rescue attempt. Peter disappeared around the Great Lakes area for years, but eventually made it back to his family from Canada and took up shoemaking.
Barbara’s widowed mother, Agnes (Fleisher) Waggoner married again to a Conrad Lutts.
The George Lantz family first settled in Maryland around the Monococy River and then moved to the Shenandoah Valley. This is the first generation of Lantz’s in America. George and his wife Catherine were both born around 1707 in Germany. They had emigrated together along with a few of their children.
This is the only bit of German that I have found so far on the Shepard side of the family, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t more.