Young Clarence Hamm

Headstone image found at FindaGrave memorial

You probably don’t remember anything about Clarence Hamm. That’s most likely because he was only 8 years old when he died from injuries received in a car accident in 1935.

It was a nice 80º day in Wisconsin. Clarence, his brother Arthur, his mother, Emma, and Uncle Paugel were heading home from a day of berry picking north of Antigo, when disaster struck.

The Wittenberg Enterprise, August 8, 1935 
Clarence Hamm Funeral Is Being Held This Afternoon
Funeral services for Clarence Hamm, the eight-year-old boy who died Sunday as the result of an automobile accident, is being held this afternoon at the Dobber Funeral Home and at First Lutheran church in this village. The Rev. N. B. Ursin officiated in the absence of the Rev. T. Aug. Lillehei, pastor of the congregation, who is on a vacation. Interment was in Forest Home Cemetery. The pall-bearers were Marty Swensen, Vernon and Kenneth Matson, Robert Heistad, Kenneth and Magnus Gunderson.

August 21, 1935
Clarence Hamm Dies Following Auto Crash 
Eight-Year-Old Wittenberg Boy Is Fatally Injured Early Sunday Evening 
An eight-year-old boy was killed and seven people were injured, two critically, Sunday night when two cars collided head-on on highway 45 just north of Koepenick. 
The boy, Clarence Hamm, of this village, died on his way to Memorial hospital at Antigo from a severe skull fracture. 
The injured are: Mrs. George Hamm, Wittenberg, mother of the dead boy, condition critical, suffering from a fractured skull and badly lacerated right arm; doctors doubt she will live. 
Mrs. Harold Zeiler, Chicago, broken arm and leg and body injuries. 
Albert Paugel, Wittenberg, driver of the Chevrolet coach carrying the Wittenberg party, lacerations over entire body. 
Arthur Hamm, 12, Wittenberg, son of Mrs. George Hamm, lacerations to the head. 
Harold Zeiler; Chicago, head injuries. 
Kenneth Anderson, Ironwood, Michigan, lacerations to his head.
Bert Wesley, Antigo, dislocated shoulder. 
It could not be learned definitely, just how the accident occurred, says the Antigo Journal. The Wittenberg party was bound south after a day picking blueberries. Zeiler, his wife, Anderson, and Wesley were going north in an Oldsmobile sedan. Zeiler was driving.
Paugel turned out to pass a Chevrolet truck being driven by Vernon Stoltenberg, Amherst Junction. Evidently seeing the other car Paugel tried to turn in again but side-swiped the truck. The Chevrolet then swerved directly into the path of the oncoming Oldsmobile the cars colliding head-on.
Almost all the people in the Chevrolet were thrown clear of the car. Mr. and Mrs. Zeiler were thrown through the windshield of the Oldsmobile. 
Passing motorists picked up the injured and rushed them into Antigo. Both cars, especially the Chevrolet, were demolished. Bill Hamm, 23, of Wittenberg, a brother of the dead boy, and Emil Klabunde, about 40, also of Wittenberg were sitting in the rear seat of the Chevrolet with Arthur Hamm. They were not injured, although they were thrown clear of the car. 
Zeigler, who lives in Chicago, is a traveling representative of the McClellan stores. He is stationed at Wausau at present. Anderson, also an employee of the McClellan stores, is working in the Antigo store as a relief man. 
The impact of the two cars colliding could be heard for more than a mile. Parts of the demolished cars were scattered around the wreckage for more than 25 ft. 
A warrant charging reckless, driving was issued Monday against Albert Paugel, driver of the Chevrolet coach carrying the Wittenberg party. The warrant will be served on Paugel as soon as he is discharged from the hospital, says the Antigo Journal.1

The case against his Uncle did indeed go to court and was reported in the Oshkosh paper:

WAUSAU MAN HELD NOT AT FAULT FOR FATAL AUTO CRASH
Judgment Reversed in Supreme Court Also Releases Indemnity Company From Liability

Madison (AP) — The state supreme court ruled today that Harold Zeiler, Wausau business man, was in no way responsible for a traffic accident near Antigo in 1935 in which a child was killed and several persons injured.
The high court reversed lower court judgments returned against Zeiler and  the Bankers Indemnity Company, with which he was insured, and ordered that the complaint against them be dismissed.
Nine year old Clarence Hamm was killed and several persons injured in an automobile collision on Highway, 45, 15 miles north of Antigo, Aug. 4, 1935.
I[n] one car were Harold Zeiler, Wausau business man, his wife, Vera and Bert Wesley, Zeiler was driving. In the other car were Albert Paugel, Wittenberg farmer, Emma Hamm, his housekeeper, and her son, Clarence.

HAD DEFECTIVE BRAKES
Trial of three damage suits in Circuit court disclosed that Paugel, whose car had defective breaks, turned to the left side of the road when a truck stopped in front of him and collided with the Zeiler car, approaching from the other direction.
Call uncle, and the latters insurer, Bankers Indemnity Company, were named defendants in suits brought by Mrs. Zeiler, Mrs. Hamm and Wesley. Paugel did not offer defense.
The jury, however, found that Zeiler was partly to blame for the accident by not maintaining a proper lookout.
Against Paugel, Zeiler and the insurance company the jury returned the following judgments; For Mrs. Zeiler, $3,688.75; for Mrs. Hamm, individually and for her son’s death, $5,191; for Wesley, $467.28.
Zeiler and the Bankers Indemnity Company appealed to the supreme court.2

As you can read in the article the insurance company was not happy with the outcome, so they took the case to the State Supreme Court. I was able to find a summary of it online, (use the link to see it.) The Supreme Court reversed the judgment of the County court and refused any rehearing of the case.

Combining all the details from the newspaper articles, and case summaries, I was able to get a pretty good sense of where this accident happened too.

According to the court case the accident happened about 15 miles north of Antigo, by a golf course on (old) 45 (now known as B). Well, the map shows the golf course. The bit circled is where there appears to be a dip in the road as mentioned in the case, which you can see if you use google maps street view. The Paugel car was going south towards Antigo, probably heading back to Shawano where they lived.

The newspaper reported that his mother Emma was critically injured and not expected to live, but she did survive her injuries. However she died not too many years later, in 1943. Fred does not appear to have been living with Emma at the time of the accident. He was somewhere in Becker County, Minnesota, according to the 1940 census (the 1940 census asked where you were living 5 years earlier). This is confirmed by the 1934 directory for Shawano, Emma is the only Hamm listed.

Clarence was one of my grandmother Myrtle’s half brothers. I do not know if she ever met him, or even if she ever heard about his death, as he was a son from her father’s 3rd marriage. And if we have a picture of Clarence in our family albums, I am unaware of which one it might be. (The problem of unlabeled family photos rears it ugly head.)

SOURCE:
1. Clarence Hamm accident, The Wittenberg Enterprise, Wittenberg, Wisconsin, 8 August 1935, page ? column?, in Antigo Journal, Antigo, Wisconsin. (Transcription of newspaper article found online <www.ancestry.com> HAMM surname message boards.)

2. 1937-11-09, Tuesday, The Oshkosh Northwestern, Oshkosh, Wisconsin; p9, col. 8

February 25, 1959 Letter Herman Shepard to His Parents

Worthington Ohio
Feb. 25, 1959

Dear Dick, Dad & Edw, [is this Dick’s brother?]

Just a line to let you know we arrived
home safe and sound. It was 1083
miles from you house to Lucilles in
Gahanna [Ohio]. We drove until 10:10 PM
Monday and covered 679 miles then
started out again at 6AM from
Yadkinville N.C. and drove the rest of
the way home arriving at Lucilles at
4:50 PM We didn’t have a bit of
trouble and the weather was all good
except on the W Va turnpike where we
had a light snow. The temperature
here this morning was 25 degrees.

We found everything here O.K.
so all I got to do now is get on the
ball and get back to work, which
shouldn’t be to bad after a nice
vacation like we had. Lucille
said that was the first real
vacation she had ever had, one
that she could remember for ever,
and we all want to thank you

[page 2]
for making it possible.

We left Ralph a bag of grape-
fruit and some oranges. of course
they wanted to know all about
you and dad and how things
were in Safety Harbor. We ate
supper at Lucilles and then
went up to Mom & Pop Krings
where we had to give them all
the news and we got home
about 11 P.M. Ralph and the
boys got along O.K. so Lucille
felt relieved about them.

I called Dick Sheridan to
night and he says every
thing at the shop is O.K. so I
suppose I still got a job.
“darn it”.

Well I’ll sign off for
now as I don’t know any
other news to write.
Love to all
Ruth & H.O.

Walker & Hatch Lumber Company

I have always known that my great great grandfather Dillon Franklin Hatch, (Frank), made his money in the wood manufacturing industry. But until now I hadn’t really known the details. Thanks to digitized newspapers, directories, and census records, I now have a better sense of how his manufacturing experience all went down. So here is the story as I know it.

When Frank married Almyra Brooks in 1873 he was working for an apothecary as a clerk, but it wasn’t long after their marriage (1874) that Frank and his new brother-in-law, David Walker, went into business together. (David was married to Frank’s wife’s sister.)

I can only speculate about where the money came from to start the business, possibly Frank’s parents, and/or his new father-in-law, John Brooks. Both families had money to spare for such an enterprise. (I don’t know about David Walker’s.) Or, the reputation of the patriarchs of these families helped them get the loans they would have needed. Regardless of the how, they did.

The following entry appeared in a local history book:

An important and promising industry is the WALKER & HATCH Lumber and Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of solid and veneered hard wood work, doors, sash, blinds, stair builders’ supplies, and all kinds of house finish. The business was started in 1874 by David WALKER and D. F. HATCH. C. E. MACOMBER was admitted to an interest in the concern in 1882, and the firm name of WALKER, HATCH & Co. adopted. The present stock company was chartered on the 12th of August, 1885, with a capital stock of $50,000. The officers are D. F. HATCH, president; David WALKER, vice-president; Gilbert HARRIS, treasurer; C. E. MACOMBER, secretary, and F. B. HOWE, clerk. At the time of the incorporation of this company they purchased the stock and interest of the Burlington Spoke Company and the Winooski Lumber Company. They make something of a specialty of the Stevens sliding blind, which is one of the best inside blinds manufactured. The buildings, situated on a five-acre plot on Winooski River, consist of a mill about 200 x 50 feet and three stories high, adjoining a saw-mill, boiler and shaving rooms, offices and sheds, and twelve large kilns for the drying of lumber, heated and arranged by the most approved methods.

CHAPTER XVIII HISTORY OF THE TOWN AND CITY OF BURLINGTON; http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vermont/ChittendenBurlington_4.html
Ad in 1881 Burlington paper.
Gazetteer and Business Directory of Chittenden County, Vermont, for 1882-83–Google Books search. You can see that David’s sister is working as a bookkeeper at the company.

Other than one tragic accident, (that we know of), in 1877, the business went along pretty well for about 10 years.

[1877 Apr 9]--On Monday afternoon a man fell down the elevator way at Walker & Hatch’s mill in Burlington, a distance of forty feet, and received injuries that were thought to be fatal.

[1877 Apr 11]-CHITTENDEN COUNTY.
Charles Beauchamp died on Saturday last, of injuries recently received at Walker & Hatch’s mill in Burlington. He leaves a widow and seven children, who were dependent on his labor for their support.

–from Orleans County Monitor and Vermont Watchman and State Journal.

In 1882 they changed the ownership of the business, and the name.

They also had visions of expansion dancing around in their heads, because in April of the next year they purchased the Burlington Spoke Company, (and a Winoonski Lumber business, although I can find no articles related to that purchase, other than the local history book entry):

Messrs. Walker, Hatch & Co., have purchased the business of the Burlington Spoke company and will carry it on under that name

Messrs. Walker, Hatch & Co.,…page 5, col. 1, Burlington weekly free press. (Burlington, Vt.), 27 April 1883. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072143/1883-04-27/ed-1/seq-5/>

The Burlington Spoke Company, WALKER & HATCH, agents, engaged in the manufacture of carriage spokes, axehelves, pick, hammer and sledge handles, have their mills located at Winooski village, and their place of business in Burlington. They employ a number of experienced workmen, and do a large business.

Gazetteer and Business Directory of  Chittenden County, Vt. For 1882-83 Compiled and Published by Hamilton Child Printed At The Journal Office, Syracuse, N. Y,  
August, 1882. 

About 2 1/2 years later, in 1885, they became a stock company. The new board, thinking that business was going very well, but could be better, decided that they needed to expand even more. So they did, literally.

The stockholders of the Walker and Hatch Lumber company of Burlington have chosen these officers: President, S. H. Weston; vice-president, David Walker; secretary, C. E. Macomber; treasurer, J. F. Leonard; clerk, C. E. Macomber; directors, David Walker, D. F. Hatch, C. E. Macomber, S. H. Weston, J. F. Leonard, A. J. Willard, Gilbert Harris; managers, D. F. Hatch, C. E. Macomber, David Walker, J. F. Leonard. This concern is building a mill 200 feet long, 50 feet wide and three stories high with all necessary equipments

The Middlebury register and Addison County journal., November 13, 1885, Image 4, (Middlebury, Vt.) 1883-1885. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98060001/1885-11-13/ed-1/seq-4/>

According to an article in the Middlebury Register a few days later, they were hoping to hire about 100 men when the new building was finished. The plans included a large store house, shavings house, office, and a brick boiler house. And looking at the map below, the location was excellent, right on the river for ease of transportation of goods. (The building no longer exists.)

This is a Sanborn Map page from Burlington showing the Walker, Hatch facility in 1884.

Unfortunately, this decision, while appearing sound at the time, was to prove their undoing. The costs involved with expanding the business became too much to handle and resulted in their inability to meet the huge expenditures. This led to the company’s insolvency in 1886, about 2 years after their fateful decision to expand.

Final notice of insolvency in 1894.

THE WALKER & HATCH FAILURE.

Meeting of the Creditors Friday—A.O. Humphrey Appointed Assignee.

The creditors of the Walker & Hatch lumber and manufacturing company held a meeting at the probate office in the city Friday and elected A. O. Humphrey, of the firm of Sanford and Humphrey, assignee. The creditors hoped to receive $.50 on the dollar allowing for shrinkage of sales, but the chances are against it. It was shown that the Winsooki water power company, who at first took stock in the new company, but subsequently sold out, have a mortgage on the factory for about $11,000 and H. E. Wright of Williston holds a mortgage on the machinery for $3000. The unsecured debts of the company aggregate about $29,000 in the estimate their assets at 17,000, but the unencumbered property will probably not sell for that amount.

The following are the major claims proved Friday: Shepard & Morse lumber company, $3450; Safford & Humphrey, $1026; Burlington Woollen Company, $320; Edwards & Stevens, $1830; A.R. Booth, $640; S. Bigwood & Son, $202; Skillings, Whitney and Barnes, $1747; B. Turk & Bro., $326.

The most important claims which have not been approved are as follows: John T. White of Concord, New Hampshire, $2000 Greenlee Brothers of Chicago, $634 … etc.

The statement of the firms affairs why the business should continue.

To the editor of the Free Press:

          The Walker & Hatch failure, I think, will turn out to be far less disastrous than was at first thought. The old company was a partnership composed of Messes. Walker, Hatch and Macomber. About one year ago they with others formed a stock company, and all the old company’s assets were turned over to the corporation. These assets, as I understand, were made up mainly of machinery, stock, both in the rough and partly finished. What their real value was it is my present purpose to consider. The old company had issued a catalog at an expense of about $2000, including the advertising in other channels, and it had worked up a good and profitable business. It was an industry which supplied a demand, and was in itself a credit to the city. The corporation made a purchase of $10,000. This was the original cost of the plant. The corporation have added to it in buildings, consisting of one large shop two stories high with basement, newly equal to another story for working purpose, a kiln two stories high and brick boiler house, the whole costing over $20,000. The buildings are complete in all their appointments with heating apparatus of the Sturtevant patent at a cost of $1,200. The shafting and main line of belting were all new and the same is true of every part of the above mentioned work except the two boilers. Probably no better shop either in its durability or in its adaptability to the uses for which it is built, can be found anywhere. The writer has seen quite a number of shops built for wood manufacture and has never seen one surpassing this one in the excellency or fitness of its appointments. The corporation have also added about $4,400 worth of new machinery and have spent some $400 in lowering the raceway. The figures above given are low considerable less that the actual cost.

If this estimate is accurate, therefore, it would appear that, calling the new machinery worth half of its cost, the plant, as it may called, with new machinery, is really worth to day to the purchaser $32,400. This does not take into account the old machinery which the old company had on hand, nor the stock on hand at the time of failure. The latter was inventoried at $8000, but was put in the schedule at $6000. The good accounts were said  to be $2500, call them $2000. There would be then in all $8000 to be added to $32,000, making $40,400 of real assets, not counting the old machinery, or the value of the work already begun and in process of completion, and which now being finished and the full value of which less the cost of finishing, from the time of the failure, must be added to the figures already given. At a low estimate based on the above considerations it would seem that as least $44,000 of assets are available. Out of this is the real estate mortgage of $11,650 and a personal estate mortgage of $3000; in all $14,650, which deducted from the assets would leave net assets of $29,350 available to the creditors. This sum is about what the unsecured debts amount to.

In the above statement the cost of the new buildings has been shrunk one-quarter, the new machinery one half, and no account made of the old machinery. The stock has been called $2000 less than the inventory made at the tie, the good accounts at their face value, and $4000 for the value of the goods in process of manufacture at them of failure.

Now this property is valuable. It is all in readiness for the carrying on of a good business. It should be added that the plant embraces one-tenth of the water power at the dam. There is a demand for the continuation of this same line of work. It is understood that order for work have come in unsolicited faster than the work could be done with a help of 70 men. It is to be hoped some enterprising man or men of means will be on hand to purchase this property, and thus a valuable industry be saved to this city.

Burlington, Vt., Oct. 15, 1886.

The Walker & Hatch Failure, page 3, col. 2 Burlington weekly free press. (Burlington, Vt.), 19 Nov. 1886. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072143/1886-11-19/ed-1/seq-3/>

It was determined that the company was in debt to the tune of about $35,000. This is calculated in today’s dollars as somewhere in the ballpark of $1,000,000. The loss of their business must have been a devastating blow, not only to themselves, but to their standing in the community.

It is no wonder that in June of 1887, Frank and his wife packed up the children, and their belongings, and headed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he had found a job managing the Sturtevant Lumber Company. Although, he only worked there a short time before we find him employed at ‘Wood, Jenks and Company’, another lumber manufacturing business in town.

The loss of his first business did not deter Frank, he stayed involved in the business of wood manufacturing and/or building his whole life. In fact in 1911 he shows up in the papers as part of a new endeavor:

Frank did pretty well for his family in Cleveland, I guess his motto was ‘never give up, never surrender’. Or it was just good old fashioned New England determination. (Just above Frank and Almyra, 1870s and 1910ish.)

July 22, 1958 William Shepard To His Parents

22 July 58
Dear Dick and Dad
I was happy to hear from you. And
to know that everything was alright. Be sure
that neither one of you do any lifting or
hard work. I wish I were with you to
enjoy the quiet and to fish. It is anything
but quiet in Europe these days.

Yes, I have an apartment, or rather, I
will have one soon. It is being built and
is near completion. Lois and the children
will probably leave Worthington between September
10th and Oct 10th.

I hope Kenny can have time to visit
before Lois leaves. We cant be sure about
anything for a few weeks. Then Lois should
hear something definite.

[page 2]
My work is keeping be busy, but I have
seen some of the country. It is much like
Ontario. Pine forests and streams. The
towns are small. It has been cold
most of the time. About 50 degrees today. And
it rains most everyday.

I had to buy a car here so that I could get
around. And when Lois comes, our Chevrolet
will be a month behind her. As long as we live
in town (Kaiserslautern) she will need the
car anyhow I bought an old 50
Desoto. It may be 2 years younger than
your Chevy, but it is old.

I haven’t heard much from Kenny, but
he is like me when it comes to writing

[page 3]
Germany is as nice as everyone described
it. the people work hard, yet they seem
happy. The houses are nearly all built
of concrete block. As soon as Lois brings
over the camera, Ill send home some pictures.
they go in a lot for heavy food. Potatoes
every meal I had sauerkraut and smoked
tenderloin tonight. It was good, only they
boil the sauerkraut until it is tasteless.

Well, its about time for the bed. Ill
have to get up early to fly tomorrow.
Take care of yourselves – you are the
only parents I have
Your Son
Bill

Fun and Games

Often when doing family history research one is presented with a few facts that you can add to the database: birth, death, where they lived. If your lucky maybe a nice obituary can be found to fill out a bit more of the person’s life. More often, not.

That is why I love doing newspaper research. Because sometimes you find out details about your ancestor’s life that you would never have known otherwise. In this case I was doing some Vermont research, because they have been adding more Vermont papers to some of the newspaper database I use. I found this fun gem regarding John Brooks, Sr. and his son, John H. Brooks, Jr, in Burlington. Looks like they enjoyed a little pool. The odds are, there was probably a little side betting going on too. At this time 1865, Junior was 28 years old.

Burlington Times (Burlington, Vermont)– Saturday, December 2, 1865, page 4. [Newspapers.com https://newscomwc.newspapers.com/image/364922592%5D

Junior ran a billiard hall later in life, maybe he had a love of the game? I found this in the University of Vermont Collage Yearbook from 1900:

I believe this was a collage boy’s drinking line, and apparently Junior’s billiard room/hall was one of ‘the places to go’ for a bit of fun.

This the Van Ness House where Junior’s billiard hall was located in Burlington. Taken about 1902, so about the same time period. It was a famous place in town.

All work and no play makes John a dull boy!

March 26th 1958 Herman Shepard To His Parents

Worthington Ohio
March 26th 1958
Dear Dick & Dad;

This is the “Old Professor” writing tonight, I’ve been
so busy with this school work and (lodge going)
that I’m way behind. Besides having my regular
night class, I gave a Career Day speech at Eastwood
High School today, and have another one comming
up next Friday at Grove City. After this week, I
have 3 more night sessions at Central, then
I’ll be through, “I hope” I don’t know yet if they
intent to carry on any further classes in
“Auto Mechanics” or not. I like the extra money,
but, with my long hours at work, and my
Lodge commitments, it really doesn’t leave me
much time for myself. If I go on with the
School work, I’ll have to drop some of the
Lodge functions. Well, thats enough griping
about my time.

We had our Father-Son Banquet last Sat.
night and Lee Miller was the guest speaker.
We have again as many to attend as we
expected. I was chairman of the committee
for Blue Lodge and Ruth was chief cook
and bottle washer for he Stars. She about
worked her self to death, went up to the
temple about 12 PM and didn’t get away

[page 2]
till 11 P.M. She and I locked the joint up. Counting
all the kitchen help and the members, they prepared
about 250 meals.

Ruth and I were up to see Lydia last Saturday
evening. We took up the rest of the Bed Room furniture
that she bought from us. She is giving up her job
of cooking and looking after her neighbor lady. She
has lost about 14 lbs and I don’t believe she has
that much to spare. We are going to have her
down here for a few days to give her a rest.
Another woman is supposed to take over for her
the last of this week.

You have been writing in your letters that
you folks were comming north and going
on to Canada this summer. I am quite
concerned about Dad making the trip, you
know he said he was going to “stay put” for
a year, also Doc. Wettercues[?] said he was not in
favor of Dad even making the trip down to Florida.
So Im just wondering, has Dad’s condition
improved enough for him to make such a
trip, or is he just bound and determined to go-
regardless! If the latter is the case, I think
it would be using poor judgement to take
such a chance. Please write and let

[page 3]
me know what ever the case may be. We love
both of you and don’t want you to do the wrong thing
so please give this a good “think” before you make
the trip. If it’s us you want to see we might
make a trip down for a few days after my
school work is over. That’s not a promise but
a thought.

Have you been enjoying and going to your
“Star meetings”? I’m so glad you got to join
the group because you are the type who will
work out very good, they will be good for
you and you for them. I’d like to hear
about your initiation and especially about
your neighbor Esther Smith. Ruth wants to
know if your “Chapter” recesses in the summer.

Has the grass, trees and flowers started to green up
yet? We are still having cold weather here and
some snow every day or two. I hope Bill,
Lois and the kids get to pay you a visit
over Easter. It would be a good chance for
them to see Florida. Bill said he would
like to buy property down there. I think it would
be a good investment for them. I hope they
like your locality. over—

[page 4]
Our business has slowed down a little. Columb
is not as bad as other places-like Detroit,
Cleveland etc. I look for a pickup when the
weather gets warmer. I believe a lot of people
will fix their cars up instead of trading for
new ones, as the case has been for the past
ten years. I’ve about run out of anything
to write, so will sign off for now.
With Love,
Ruth & H.O.

P.S. Ruth is ironing, misses her ironing lady. Ha.Ha.

P.S.S. We have 6 grape fruit left-you keep
up the grape fruit fund and we’ll take care
of your flower fund.

Hatch meets Brooks?

There might be a few more posts related to my Brooks or Hatch lines in Vermont in the next few weeks, as I have been going through updated newspaper databases recently, and found articles related to these families.

This particular recent find got me thinking about my great great grandparents:

‘Burlington Democrat’ (Burlington, Vermont–Thursday, August 31, 1871, page 3; Newspapers.com [https://newscomwc.newspapers.com/image/355390579]

Dillon F. Hatch was just installed as an officer in this Templars group. He was all for temperance, as was seen a few years earlier where he was in the same group as his mother in Grand Isle.

In this same group just under his name is listed a young lady by the name of Miss Kate Brooks. Kate was Almyra’s older sister, by about 7 years. Hmmm.

In 1870 Dillon was in Louisiana working as a clerk:

Hatch H. F.  55, male, white, Banker, value of estate 10,000 born in Vermont [probably an uncle/cousin of Dillon’s although I don’t know who; b1815ish]
Hatch, Frank D. 21, male, white, Bank clerk, born in Vermont
Hatch, Joseph R.  16, male, white, attending school, born in Vermont

Details of 1870 federal census Louisiana, Jefferson Parish, 4th ward:
page 4, enumerated 10th June 1870, lines 1-3, house 16, family 31

A year later he is living in Burlington, and working as a pharmacist (his occupation as it appeared on his marriage record and in city directories). So sometime between June 10th of 1870, and August 8 of 1871, he moved back to Vermont.

He joins the Templars group because of his interest in temperance, meets Miss Kate Brooks, who introduces him to her family, and then he meets Almyra, who is the same age as himself. BAM! They fall in love, marry just over a year later, and live happily ever after. Well, that wasn’t in the paper, so I am definitely making that part up.

Almyra Brooks and Dillon Franklin Hatch were married 19 Feb 1873.

She married him in spite of that hairdo too!

I don’t actually know how these two met, but it does seem a very likely scenario. Although, Dillon’s job as a clerk in a pharmacy/apothecary could also have been their origin story. If only I had a time machine.

January 28, 1958 Lois Shepard To Her In-Laws

January 28, 1958

Dear Dick and Dad;
Such excitement around the Shepard household as we haven’t had
in a long time. I was going to write you and send this small clip-
ing from last Saturday’s morning paper but now I shall wait and in-
clude what comes out in the paper tonight. Yesterday morning- right
after Kenny and Sue left for school, he received a telegram that he
is one of 40 winners in the Westinghouse Science Search and will get
a trip to Washington D. C. from the 27th of Feb. to March 3rd. There
he will be interviewed and has a chance to be one of the top 5 in the
Nation for awards from $3000 to $7500. The 35 other winners will
divide $8700 between them. We are so proud we could bust. He will
be on the 6 o’clock news tonight on television, They took his picture
at school this morning for the paper, he has been asked to speak at
the Civic Club here in town. Needless to say he is still in the clouds
and I might add, his mother was all day yesterday. This is from that
report he did while you were here before Xmas. It is the first time
Alabama has had a winner in the 17 years of the Science Search. Last
year Westerville had a winner. It took a Northerner to bring the honor
to Alabama. Florida is the only other Southern State to have a winner

We are all fine. Sue and Alan received their birthday cards and
money all right. We’ve had enough chocolate cake this month to last
the rest of the year. In fact there is still a piece of Sue’s cake
left so you know something is wrong. We gave her a blouse and some
money so she bought a book on Art with some of the money. Alan wants
to go over to the shopping center tonight and spend some of his birth-
day money. He got Cowboy boots and hat from us.

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This week I am going to the base hospital every morning for Physical Therapy for my bursitis,. They give me hot packs and then Ultra-sonic treatment. I think it is helping some. The Dr. says my back has a
slipped disk that now is almost completely shattered and that in about
two years time should be replaced by scar tissue and so join the vert-
abrae and then won’t give me any more trouble. Sure hope he’s right
about not giving me more trouble. Alan is to start his eye exercises
in about six weeks – they were full up and couldn’t take him any sooner.

Hope Dad is getting along all right. Suppose you are busy but let
us hear from you.

Love

Lois

Robbed By Boarder

Living in the big city can be a little more exciting than the little towns most of my ancestors lived in. As in the case of this robbery:

Pawtuxet Valley Cleaner, vXXII, issue 22, March 16, 1897, page 1, col. 3

This is Dennis Cain, my great great Uncle who lived with his wife Mary Agnes in Rhode Island, (he worked in the fabric mills there his whole life). At the time of this incident he was living in East Greenwich.

I’m thinking he will be a little more careful about his boarders in the future.

October 26, 1957 Letter W.A.S. To Dick Shepard

I believe this is a letter written by William Shepard, Sr, to his wife Dick. He must have had an operation in Ohio while Dick was still in Florida, or up north in Canada? For a guy who use to be a teacher his grammar is not so good!

Columbus Ohio
Sat. Oct. 26-1957

Re’cd your note of Wed., about 1 pm today.
It is now 2:45 PM I am listening to State &
Wisconsin game and write you as I hear the
game. The weather here has been cool for the
last few days I think it was 35 this am

I have been taking walks almost everyday
and enjoy them very much.

I have no information as to when I may be
able to get out of here. The Dr. has made
no mention as to when I will get the xray
I will mention it to him Monday A.M.
I will advise you as to any information
the Dr. gives me. I think I am
doing very well and hope to be out
of here soon.

Dick when you come back north I
would like you bring me wool hat
and overcoat.

I will not write you too often as
you know I hate to write letters it
also makes me feel nervous
I am sending a clipping from the
paper you remember the Edministes.
Well the ball game is over State
wone 16 to 13 not too good a game
supper is over I was all
ready to take a walk but will


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not, because of light rain falling.

The paper predicts light snow maby.
for tonight

Dick you take your time about coming
home see too all business as we may
not be able get back down there for
some time.

I had a note from Alan David and
Sue Sue was secretary for Alan
I would love to see the family (Bills)
Sunday 12:30PM.

Dick I will close this short letter I
expect H.O. & Ruth to come soon. I will
have them mail this so you may get
it Tues.

The weather is gloomy today with
ocassional bits of snow. In the air
Will try and drop you a short
note Weds. evening.

With love, W.A.S.