Crandon doings

The Crandon newspapers have been providing me with much amusement lately. Here is an article that includes my grandfather and his Uncle Harry:

The masquerade given here last Friday night by the Woodman Lodge drew over fifty couples, including many maskers. Prizes were won by…Harry Cain, dressed as Charlie Chaplin, and most comic gentleman…Clarence John in an Odd Fellow’s suit was best dressed gentleman. The Royal Neighbors served supper on the stage.1

I think all that fame went to gramp’s head, and he felt the need to celebrate:

Clarence John has suddenly taken a musical turn of mind and has whittled a ukalale out of a cigar box and slab and with the aid of a little hay wire is now putting in his spare time playing those popular Keith & Hiles lumberyard strains, “The Curse Of An Aching Back”, and “Working For Whisnant At Two Bones A Day.”2

ukulelelrg


Sources:
1. Friday, Mar 1 1918, p8c3, No. 26 32nd year; Forest Republican, Crandon, WI —Crandon Public library digital images.

2. Friday, Mar 22, 1918, p1c2, No. 29 32nd year; Forest Republican, Crandon, WI —Crandon Public library digital images.

  1. Ukulele plans found online: https://stansplans.com/ukulele_prplans.html. Get krackin’!

 

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Clarence goes a courtin’

3215370619_83f9e115f3_oCourting Under Difficulties
Clarence John went to Cloma Sunday night, to sit up with a young lady friend. For the benefit of our readers who do not know where Cloma is located, we will state that it lies “somewhere near Nashville” and that S. W. Beggs is mayor of the village. Clarence evidently had some time, for in relating his trip he says, “I had heard it was hard to get there so I put on my bathing suit and started out at about eight bells. I walked two miles, swam a large creek, waded through mud up to my suspenders for a mile, jumped here and there on a wet corduroy road like a grasshopper and finally reached Siding Three at about twelve bells. Here I borrowed a horse from a gent and rode another mile, then a flock of large mosquitoes carried me a mile further, and at last I followed a cow into town just as Daddy Ison was getting up to feed his hog. The young lady was waiting for me so I sat down and rested a few minutes and then took a morning train back home. Talk about hard luck—I sure had it. I don’t see why girls want to move way out in the suburbs for anyway.”1

I have been having fun finding more digitizied newspapers available online. The Oconto County papers have been exceptionally good, and now I am finding some from Crandon.

This amusing tale was in the paper when Clarence, my grandfather, was 19 years old.


Source:
1. Friday, Jul 19, 1918, p1c1, No. 46, 32nd year; Forest Republican, Crandon, WI —Crandon Public library digital images.

Burglars Thwarted!

I found this article doing a newspaper search recently on Alexander Lantz in West Virginia papers. I have to admit I have had very little luck finding newspapers with any of my West Virginia ancestors in them, so imagine my surprise when I hit pay dirt.

When Alexander and Margret Lantz were first married they spent about 15 or so years living in Greene County, Pennsylvania near their parents. Possibly because their own children were old enough to marry and move on, the two left for Tyler County, West Virginia, for a short time, before they eventually settled in Wetzel County, West Virginia, about 1841. They are both buried in the Jacksonburg area.

I believe that the article below is about my Alex because he would have been ‘an old man’ at the time of this incident, and from what I can surmise he was also the only Alexander Lantz living in the area, at least according to census records.

newspaper_lantzalex_1875 copy

This incident. which looks like it happened in 1871, was being reported in the newspaper in 1875 (Alex was dead in January of 1873), which does make me leery in claiming that this is my 5x great grandfather in regards to this case. However, possibly because the case was criminal in nature, even if the intended victim had died after the fact, they would still continue to try the perpetrators of the crime. This one appears to have gone on for several years before the men were finally acquited.

I have to say this article is a little confusing regarding why they let the men off. They were caught in the act, by multiple people. But at least no one was hurt.


Source:
1. The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, newspaper, Ohio County, West Virginia, Sat morning, April 24, 1875, page 3 column 2.